Hypertension High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is a measure of the force of blood against the walls of arteries. It is recorded as two numbers: the systolic pressure over the diastolic pressure. Systolic pressure is the pressure as the heart beats, while diastolic pressure measures the pressure when the heart relaxes between beats.

Blood pressure is normally measured at the brachial artery with a sphyg-momanometer (pressure cuff) in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and given as systolic over diastolic pressure. Normal blood pressure is less than 120 mm Hg systolic and less than 80 mm Hg diastolic—usually expressed as "120 over 80." However, normal for an individual varies with the height, weight, fitness level, age, and health of a person. Blood pressure is normally maintained within narrow limits, but it can drop during sleep or increase during exercise. Hypertension (HTN), or high blood pressure, occurs when the force of blood passing through blood vessels is above normal. The increase in pressure forces the blood to hit the blood vessel walls. HTN is called "the silent killer" because many people do not know they have the condition. Consistently high blood pressure increases the risk for a stroke or a heart attack.

cardiovascular: related to the heart and circulatory system artery: blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart toward the body tissues stress: heightened state of nervousness or unease oxygen: O2, atmospheric gas required by all animals toxins: poison nutrient: dietary substance necessary for health hypertension: high blood pressure atherosclerosis: build-up of deposits within the blood vessels coronary heart disease: disease of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels surrounding the heart stroke: loss of blood supply to part of the brain, due to a blocked or burst artery in the brain blood pressure: measure of the pressure exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels heart attack: loss of blood supply to part of the heart, resulting in death of heart muscle

The sphygmomanometer around this woman's arm is inflated until it collapses her brachial artery, and then gradually deflated. Blood rushing into the vessel makes Korotkoff sounds that are used to time the measurements of systolic and diastolic pressure. [Photograph by Michael Keller. Corbis. Reproduced by permission.]

The sphygmomanometer around this woman's arm is inflated until it collapses her brachial artery, and then gradually deflated. Blood rushing into the vessel makes Korotkoff sounds that are used to time the measurements of systolic and diastolic pressure. [Photograph by Michael Keller. Corbis. Reproduced by permission.]

diet: the total daily food intake, or the types of foods eaten obesity: the condition of being overweight, according to established norms based on sex, age, and height plaque: material forming deposits on the surface of the teeth, which may promote bacterial growth and decay lipid: fats, waxes and steroids; important components of cell membranes cholesterol: multi-ringed molecule found in animal cell membranes; a type of lipid triglyceride: a type of fat trans-fatty acids: type of fat thought to increase the risk of heart disease diabetes: inability to regulate level of sugar in the blood

It may be caused by poor diet, obesity, smoking, stress, and inactivity. The Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) project recommends a diet that is low in sodium and high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products. Other approaches to controlling HTN include weight loss, smoking cessation, increased physical activity, and stress management.

The Most Important Guide On Dieting And Nutrition For 21st Century

The Most Important Guide On Dieting And Nutrition For 21st Century

A Hard Hitting, Powerhouse E-book That Is Guaranteed To Change The Way You Look At Your Health And Wellness... Forever. Everything You Know About Health And Wellness Is Going To Change, Discover How You Can Enjoy Great Health Without Going Through Extreme Workouts Or Horrendous Diets.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment