European Settlement

The Arawaks and Caribs, the first natives of the islands, were not treated kindly, however, as the Spanish, French, Dutch, and British conquered the islands at different periods, all but wiping out the native populations. Today, only a few aboriginals remain in the Caribbean.

The European settlers soon realized that sugarcane was a profitable crop that could be exported to the European market. However, there was a shortage of European farmers, and slaves were brought from Africa to work on the sugar plantations. The slave trade started in 1698. European settlers fought to keep their territories and hoped for great wealth, while actively pursuing the sugar and slave trades.

Two things changed the situation on the islands. In 1756, missionaries from Germany (Moravian Protestants), came to the islands, though the landowners were opposed to their presence, fearing that any education of the slaves could lead to a revolution. At about the same time a German scientist by the name of Margraf discovered that sugar could be produced from beets, and many European countries began to produce their own sugar.

In 1772, after many revolts and uprisings, the Europeans began to free their slaves. The sugar plantations still needed laborers, however, and indentured workers were brought from China and India to work in the fields. Sugar cane, and its by-products, molasses and rum, brought great prosperity to the settlers. However, not wanting to depend solely on sugar, they began to grow yams, maize, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, coconuts, and pineapples on a very

The ancestors of many Caribbean islanders were brought as slaves to work on the sugarcane plantations. In the New World, their traditional African cuisines integrated new flavors both from their new environment and from the cuisines of various European colonial powers. [Catherine Karnow/ Corbis. Reproduced by permission.]

The ancestors of many Caribbean islanders were brought as slaves to work on the sugarcane plantations. In the New World, their traditional African cuisines integrated new flavors both from their new environment and from the cuisines of various European colonial powers. [Catherine Karnow/ Corbis. Reproduced by permission.]

large scale. Coffee also began to flourish. Many of the islands had wild pigs diet: the total daily food intake, or the and cattle on them, and spiced, smoked meat became part of the diet. Today, types of foods eaten jerk meat is a specialty.

Dieting Dilemma and Skinny Solutions

Dieting Dilemma and Skinny Solutions

The captivating thing about diets is that you don't get what is researched or predicted or calculated but rather, you get precisely what you expect. If the diet resonates with you then it will likely work, if it doesn't resonate, it won't.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment