Mimosa pdica L Leguminosae Touchmenot Sensitive Plant Rumput Simalu

Mimosa púdica leaves and flowers

Description: Mimosa pudica L. is a prickly, herbaceous weed. Leaves bipin-nate, very sensitive, fold together when touched, in rain or at night. Leaflets are 15-20 pairs, small oblong, nearly sessile. Flowers are pink and fruits are flat pods covered with bristles.[1-3]

Origin: Native to Brazil.[3]

Phytoconstituents: Mimosine, 2-Hydroxymethyl-chroman-4-one and others.[4-6]

Traditional Medicinal Uses: The plant is used on cuts and wounds.[4,7] It is also used for childbirth and infertility in Trinidad and Tobago.[8] Bath with plant decoction relieves insomnia.[4] The leaves are used for hydrocele, dressing for sinus, sores, piles and swelling of feet. In Mexico, aqueous extracts from dried leaves are employed to alleviate depression.[9] In the Philippines, the leaves soaked in coconut oil is used for ulcers.[4]

Pharmacological Activities: Anthelmintic.[10] Antibacterial,[11] Anticonvulsant,[12] Antidepressant,[9] Antifertility,[13] Antifungal,[5] Hyperglycaemic,[14] Antioestrogenic[15] and Antivenom.[1617]

Dosage: No information as yet.

Adverse Reactions: No information as yet.

Toxicity: No information as yet.

Contraindications: No information as yet.

Drug-Herb Interactions: No information as yet.

49. Mirabilis jalapa L. (Nyctaginaceae)

Four O'Clock Flower, Bunga Pukul Empat

Flowers of Mirabilis jalapa

Description: Mirabilis jalapa L. is an erect herb that can grow up to 1 m tall. Leaves are simple, heart-shaped, 3-12 cm long, opposite, tapering to a pointed end. Flowers are bisexual, red, pink, yellow or white, with perianth distinctly constricted above, and they bloom late in the afternoon. Fruits are black and globose, 5-8 mm in diameter.[1,2]

Origin: Native to tropical America, introduced in China and in many tropical areas.[2]

Phytoconstituents: Trigonellin, 2/-0-methylabronisoflavone, 6-methoxy-boeravinone C and betaxanthins.[3,4]

Traditional Medicinal Uses: Its leaves are used as a decoction for abscesses, juice for wounds and cooked with pork as tonic.[5] The leaves are also placed on boils, blisters, and to relieve urticaria.[6] In Indochina, the seeds are used as a purgative.[3] The flowers release a strong odour at night which will stupefy or drive away mosquitoes.[7] The roots are used as a laxative in a decoction, with or without pork, for colds, inflammation and leucorrhoea.[5] In Malagassy, Madagascar, they are used to treat intestinal pains. In South Africa, the roots are used as purgative agents.[7]

Pharmacological Activities: Antibacterial,[89] Antifungal,[410] Antineoplastic and Abortifacient.[11]

Dosage: Approximately 8-10 g of roots are taken as a purgative.[12]

Adverse Reactions: No information as yet.

Toxicity: No information as yet.

Contraindications: No information as yet.

Drug-Herb Interactions: No information as yet.

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