Type 1 Diabetes Worldwide Prevalence

In 1997 there were 11.5 million people with T1D in the world; this figure is expected to rise to 23.7mil-lion in the year 2010. These increasing figures will have most impact in Asia, where there are currently 4.5 million people with T1D, and this is expected to rise to 12 million by the year 2010. One of the best incidence studies has come from Europe as part of a European collaboration, where the highest incidence of T1D is found in Finland and the lowest rates in Romania (Table 1). The incidence of T1D follows a north-south gradient, with the notable exception of Sardinia. The figures from countries such as India are less precise, although one study in Chennai suggested an incidence equivalent to that found in Southern European countries. These different rates of T1D are likely to reflect both the genetic background of individual countries and differences in exposure to environmental agents. In recent years,

Table 1 Extremes of incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus in different ethnic groups

Higher

Incidencea

Lower

Incidencea

Sardinia

35-40

Venezuala

0-5

Finland

35-40

Peru

0-5

Sweden

25-30

China

0-5

Canada

20-25

Paraguay

0-5

Norway

20-25

Mauritius

0-5

UK

15-25

Chile

0-5

NewZealand

10-25

Japan

0-5

Portugal

5-20

Barbados

0-5

aAge standardized incidence (per 100,000 per year) of type 1 diabetes in children <14 years of age.

Data from Karvonen M, Viik-Kajander M, Moltchanova E et al (2000) Incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes worldwide. Diabetes Care 23: 1516-1526.

aAge standardized incidence (per 100,000 per year) of type 1 diabetes in children <14 years of age.

Data from Karvonen M, Viik-Kajander M, Moltchanova E et al (2000) Incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes worldwide. Diabetes Care 23: 1516-1526.

the incidence of T1D has been increasing in several different countries. These changes must reflect environmental influences.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment