Low Carbohydrate Diets

The recent trend of weight loss diets promotes some level of carbohydrate restriction and increased protein consumption. Some examples are Dr Atkins New Diet Revolution, The South Beach Diet, and The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet. This dietary advice is contrary to that proposed by governmental agencies (US Department of Agriculture/Department of Health Services, National Institutes of Health) and nongovernmental organizations (American Dietetic Association, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, and American Cancer Society).

There is consistent evidence that weight loss in low-carbohydrate diets is triggered by negative energy balance resulting from low caloric intake, and that it is not a function of macronutrient composition. There is no scientific evidence to suggest that low-carbohydrate diets are more metabolically efficient than restricted calorie conventional diets. Several studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets result in weight loss because of reduced caloric intake.

Low-carbohydrate diets promote the lipolysis of stored triacylglycerols known as ketosis, reduce glucose and insulin levels, and suppress appetite. As a result, there is an increase in blood uric acid concentration. Some studies have shown that the consumption of high amounts of nondairy protein results in a decline in kidney functions in individuals with mildly compromised kidney function. However, no such effect has been shown in individuals with normal kidney functions. Furthermore, low-carbohydrate diets can have side effects such as bad taste, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, nausea, thirst, and fatigue.

Low-carbohydrate diets lack essential vitamins and minerals because of inadequate consumption of fruit, vegetables, and grains, and require supplementation to achieve nutritional adequacy. Controlled trials of low-carbohydrate diets are necessary to establish long-term effectiveness and adverse health effects or benefits.

Supplements For Diabetics

Supplements For Diabetics

All you need is a proper diet of fresh fruits and vegetables and get plenty of exercise and you'll be fine. Ever heard those words from your doctor? If that's all heshe recommends then you're missing out an important ingredient for health that he's not telling you. Fact is that you can adhere to the strictest diet, watch everything you eat and get the exercise of amarathon runner and still come down with diabetic complications. Diet, exercise and standard drug treatments simply aren't enough to help keep your diabetes under control.

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