Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

This disorder, which is defined as hyperglycemia first detected during pregnancy, occurs in 2-5% of pregnant women. Often, one cannot determine whether glucose intolerance antedated the pregnancy or whether hyperglycemia was provoked by the hormonal milieu associated with pregnancy. Hyperglycemia remits postpartum in 90% of women with gestational diabetes, but these women are at increased risk for subsequent development of diabetes, which is usually type 2. Although most cases of this form of diabetes are detected by blood glucose screening performed as a routine procedure early in the third trimester, the current recommendation is that universal screening is probably unwarranted. A woman younger than age 25 years, of normal body weight, without a family history of diabetes or a personal history of poor pregnancy outcome, and from an ethnic group with low rates of diabetes is at sufficiently low risk of gestational diabetes that glucose testing can be omitted. In contrast, women with clinical features associated with a high risk of gestational diabetes (obesity, positive family history, persistent glyco-suria, and prior gestational diabetes) should be screened as early in the pregnancy as is feasible.

In women who have documented gestational diabetes, a follow-up glucose tolerance test should be performed 6 weeks postpartum unless overt diabetes is evident.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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