Bioavailability

Several dietary constituents decrease the bioavailability of calcium in food. Increasing fiber intake by, for example, replacing white flour by whole wheat flour in a typical Western diet has long been associated with negative calcium balance even when calcium intakes meet recommended levels. Likewise, the fiber in fruits and vegetables can cause negative calcium balance. In cereals, phytic acid is the main constituent of fiber that binds calcium, making it unavailable for absorption. The fermentation of bread during leavening reduces phytate content substantially, making calcium more bioavail-able. In fruits and vegetables, the uronic acids in hemi-cellulose are strong calcium binders, as is the oxalic acid present in high concentrations in foods such as spinach. Calcium bioavailability from beans is approximately half and that from spinach approximately one-tenth of the bioavailability from milk. In contrast, calcium absorption from low-oxalate vegetables, such as kale, broccoli, and collard greens, is as good as that from milk. The difference in calcium absorption between the various forms of supplements is not large.

Dietary fat does not affect calcium absorption except in individuals with diseases that impair fat malabsorption (e.g., short bowel syndrome, celiac disease, and pancreatitis). In these conditions, the calcium forms an insoluble and unabsorbable 'soap' with the unabsorbed fat in the alkaline lumen of the small intestine, potentially resulting in impaired bone mineralization. In addition, the luminal calcium is not available to precipitate the oxalates, meaning that the free oxalates will be hyperabsorbed leading to increased risk for renal oxalate stones. Neither dietary phosphorus nor a wide range of phosphorus-to-calcium ratios affect intestinal calcium absorption in very low-birth-weight infants and adults.

Lactose improves calcium absorption in young infants, in whom absorption of calcium is predominantly by passive transport. In adults, the presence of lactose in the diet has little effect on the efficiency of calcium absorption.

100 Weight Loss Tips

100 Weight Loss Tips

Make a plan If you want to lose weight, you need to make a plan for it. Planning involves setting your goals both short term and long term ones. With proper planning, you would be able to have an effective guide on the steps that you want to take, towards losing pounds of weight. Aside from that, it would also keep you motivated.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment