Feature 2 Depth of the Nerve

More acu-reflex points are formed along superficial nerve trunks than along deeper ones. The superficial nerve receptors become sensitized more easily than receptors of nerves located deep in the tissue. For example, the sciatic nerve is the biggest nerve trunk in the human body, but only a few acu-reflex points can be attributed to this big nerve in the gluteal and thigh region because there the nerve lies deep beneath the thick gluteal and hamstring muscles. As the sciatic nerve enters the posterior compartment of the thigh and popliteal fossa and reaches the leg, it emerges superficially and forms branches. More acu-reflex points are found along

Superficial temporal artery

Auriculotemporal nerve (V/3)

Greater occipital nerve

Parotid plexus (VII)

Lesser occipital nerve

Splenius capitis Great auricular nerve Accessory nerve [XI] External jugular vein

Supraclavicular nerves Trapezius

Superficial temporal artery

Auriculotemporal nerve (V/3)

Supra Splenius Capitis

Supra-orbital nerve (V/1)

Supra-orbital artery

Supratrochlear nerve (V/1)

Infra-orbital nerve (V/2)

Figure 7-3 Acu-reflex points associated with thicker nerves become sensitized faster than those associated with thinner nerves. Thus for example, the infraorbital nerve is sensitized faster than the supraorbital nerve.

Supra-orbital nerve (V/1)

Supra-orbital artery

Supratrochlear nerve (V/1)

Infra-orbital nerve (V/2)

Mental nerve (V/3)

Facial artery Facial vein

Cervical branch (VII) Transverse cervical nerve Sternocleidomastoid Transverse cervical vein

Figure 7-3 Acu-reflex points associated with thicker nerves become sensitized faster than those associated with thinner nerves. Thus for example, the infraorbital nerve is sensitized faster than the supraorbital nerve.

this nerve's branches in the leg. The same principle is applicable to other nerve trunks.

The pattern of acu-reflex point formation is the same in the upper extremity and the lower extremity. Nerve trunks in the upper limbs are located either deep beneath the muscles or inside the neurovascu-lar compartment. As a result, only a few acu-reflex points are formed in the upper arm. On their way to the forearm, nerve trunks emerge closer to the surface, and therefore more acu-reflex points appear in this region. This is why more acu-reflex points are formed below than above the elbows and knees.

How acu-reflex point formation is affected by the depth of a nerve is illustrated as follows: The deep radial nerve is derived from the brachial plexus and courses through the upper arm without forming any important acu-reflex points. When it emerges from the deep fascia to the superficial fascia in the forearm, it forms the most important acu-reflex point in the body (H1 deep radial nerve) (Fig. 7-4).

Superficial acu-reflex points become sensitive more often than deeply located acu-reflex points because of the abundance of sensory receptors around the location where they are formed. An interesting neurologic fact is that the limbs below the elbows and knees occupy larger areas in the sensory gyrus in the brain. Therefore the acu-reflex points below elbows and knees also occupy a larger part of the cortical representation in the postcentral sensory gyrus in the brain. This may explain why acu-reflex points below elbows and knees contain more sensory receptors and why needling stimulation of these points may induce a stronger reaction and activity in the brain.

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Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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