Mo Rosser

The publishers would like to thank the following individuals and institutions for permission to reproduce copyright material:

© Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection Ltd: Figure 0.1; © The British Library, Or.6810,f.27v: Figure 0.2; © Andrew Brookes/Corbis: Figure 1.1; © Michael Keller/Corbis: Figure 3.1; © Carlton Professional: Figures 10.1, 10.2; © Dimitri Iundt/Corbis: Figure 11.1.

The commissioned photographs were taken by Susan Ford.

Every effort has been made to obtain necessary permission with reference to copyright material. The publishers apologise if inadvertently any sources remain unacknowledged and will be glad to make the necessary arrangements at the earliest opportunity.

This page intentionally left blank r-\

Contents

Introduction 1

Learning and assessment guidance 3

Brief history of massage 8

Part A: Underpinning knowledge 13

1 Health, safety and hygiene 14

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 15

The therapist's role in maintaining health and safety 17

in their place of work Safety considerations when dealing with hazardous substances 20

Safety considerations when using electrical equipment 22

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous 24 Occurrences Regulations 1985 (RIDDOR)

First aid at work 25

Manual handling 26

Fire precautions 28

Risk assessment 29

Hygiene 31

2 Body systems and the physiological and psychological 47 effects of massage

Organisational levels 47

The integumentary system 53

The skeletal system 62

The muscular system 68

The cardio-vascular system 74

The lymphatic system 80

The respiratory system 84

The digestive system 88

The nervous system 92

The urinary system 99

The endocrine system 102

Psychological effects of massage 106

Part B: Consultation, preparation and massage movements 109

3 Professional conduct, ethics and preparation 110

Ethics 111

Client consultation 112

Contra-indications to massage 115

Referring clients to a medical practitioner 125

Preparation for massage 125

4 Classification of massage and the effleurage group 137

Classification of massage movements 137

The effleurage group 138

Effleurage 139

Stroking 143

5 The petrissage group 147

Kneading 147

Wringing 153

Picking up 155

Skin rolling 156

Muscle rolling 158

Frictions 159

6 The percussion and vibration groups 163

The percussion (tapotement) group 163

Hacking 164

Cupping 166

Beating 166

Pounding 167

The vibration group 168

Shaking 168

Vibration 169

Part C: Massage routines and adaptations 171

7 Massage routines 172

Basic guidelines 172

Leg 176

Arm 182

Chest and abdomen 186

Back 191

Face and head 195

8 Adapting massage for specific conditions 207

Conditions that benefit from massage 207

Reducing stress and tension 208

Combating mental and physical fatigue 209

Relieving oedema 210

Reducing cellulite 215

Male clients 218

Evaluation of treatment 219

Home advice 221

Diet 221

Relaxation 222

Posture 224

Breathing exercises 232

Evaluation of own performance 233

9 Additional techniques 236

Massage techniques for musculo-skeletal problems 236

Neuromuscular-skeletal techniques 244

Passive movements 254

Body brushing 268

10 Mechanical massage 274

Gyratory vibrator 275

Percussion vibrator 280

Audio-sonic vibrator 280

Heat treatment 283

11 Introduction to sports massage 290

Training 290

Benefits of sports massage 291

Use of massage in sport 293

Pre-event massage 293

Post-event massage 295

Training massage 298

Treatment massage 301

Contra-indications to sports massage 304

Answers to questions from Health, safety and hygiene chapter 306

Appendix: Terminology of surfaces and structures 309

Glossary 311

Index 313

This page intentionally left blank r-\

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Essential Aromatherapy

Essential Aromatherapy

Have you always wanted to know what is aromatherapy? Here are some invaluable information on aromatherapy. I leave absolutely nothing out! Everything that I learned in order to improve my life with aromatherapy I share with you.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment