Evaluation of treatment

After each treatment it is important to assess how effective the treatment has been. You must decide whether the treatment has produced the effects that you were expecting, and whether the goals you set at the beginning have been met. In order to evaluate the treatment you will need to obtain feedback this means gathering all the information you can, which will indicate the effectiveness of the treatment. Knowledge of the results of the treatment will enable you to make changes or modifications...

Skin lesions disorders and diseases

It is very important to examine the skin thoroughly before giving massage. The skin can be affected by many problems, which must be identified prior to massage. Some will have to be avoided whereas others may need medical referral. If you have to encourage a client to see the doctor, you must do so in a very tactful manner and not alarm nor offend the client. Macule this is a mark or discoloured patch that lies flat on the skin. Papule this is a small elevated pimple. Vesicle this is a very...

Massage in ancient times

Persian Massage

The earliest evidence of massage being used is found in the cave paintings of ancient cave dwellers. These wall drawings and paintings show people massaging each other. Various artefacts also found contain traces of fats and oils mixed with herbs. These indicate that lubricants may have been used, perhaps for healing, soothing or beautifying purposes. As early as 3000 bc, the Chinese practised massage to cure ailments and improve general health. Records of this can be found in the British...

The development of modern massage techniques

Modern massage techniques have evolved mainly from a system developed by a Swedish physiologist called Per Henrik Ling (1776-1839). He developed a system of passive and active exercises known as 'Swedish Remedial Gymnastics' and also a system of massage movements. Ling used the terms 'effleurage', 'petrissage', 'vibration', 'friction', 'rolling' and 'slapping'. Most of these terms are still used today, but some changes and modifications have been made in the groupings and names of...

Effects of massage on adipose tissue

Adipose tissue is a connective tissue composed mainly of specialised cells called adipocytes, adapted to store fat. It is found under the skin in the subcutaneous layer and around organs. Fat is the body's energy reserve. It is stored when energy intake is greater than energy output and utilised if energy intake is less than energy output. Therefore, the only way of losing fat is through sensible eating and increasing activity or exercise. However, massage is thought to help the dispersal of...

Contraindications to passive movements

Examine the joints carefully and ask appropriate questions. If any of the following conditions are present then the treatment should not be carried out. Bone fractures avoid working on the affected limb until healing is complete the other unaffected limbs can be treated. Swelling of the joint swelling may indicate some damage to the joint and passive movements are contra-indicated. However, if there is no damage, swelling around the ankles may be due to an accumulation of tissue fluid passive...

The therapists role in maintaining health and safety in their place of work

The employer manager is responsible for the management and control of health, safety and welfare issues, which will ensure a safe environment for all persons working in or attending the salon clinic. However, all therapists at work also have a duty under the Act. take reasonable care to avoid harm to themselves or to others by their behaviour or working practices cooperate with and help employers managers to meet the statutory requirements refrain from misusing or interfering with anything...

Massage in classical Greece and Rome

The Greeks believed in the cultivation of a healthy mind and body, which is similar to the 'holistic approach' practised by many people today. Rituals of bathing, massage, exercise or dancing were practised by men and women. They encouraged the pursuit of physical fitness and organised regular sporting, gymnastic and athletic competitions. Massage was used before events to improve performance and after events to relieve fatigue and aid recovery. Gladiators and soldiers were massaged before...

Differences between effleurage and stroking

Effleurage Massage

Effleurage must always follow the direction of venous return back to the heart and the direction of lymphatic drainage towards the nearest group of lymphatic nodes. Stroking may be performed in any direction. The pressure during effleurage may be light, moderate or heavy, but always increases at the end of the stroke towards the lymphatic nodes. The pressure of stroking is selected at the commencement and is maintained throughout. It also may be light, moderate or heavy pressure depending on...

Twentiethcentury developments

During the First World War the demand for massage to treat the injured grew and many more massage therapists were trained. Membership of the Society of Trained Masseuses grew and in 1920 it amalgamated with the Institute of Massage and Remedial Exercise. In recognition of the valuable work contributed by its members during the war, a Royal Charter was granted and the title was changed to the Chartered Society of Massage and Medical Gymnastics. The title was changed again in 1943 and became the...

The Dark Ages to the Renaissance

Little is known about massage or health and beauty practices throughout the Dark and Middle Ages, i.e. from the decline of the Roman Empire around 500 ad until the Middle Ages around 1400 ad. Few records remain from those days of wars, strict religions, superstition and persecution. Little value was placed on education, the arts, physical health and fitness. Following this period came the Renaissance (rebirth) in 1450 ad. Interest in the arts and sciences flourished and there was renewed...

Effects of massage on the respiratory system

The air passages are lined with a mucous membrane that continuously secretes a small quantity of mucus. This moistens the tubes and traps any organisms and particles in the inspired air. Any irritation of this membrane will result in an increase in the production of mucus. This mucus may thicken and become difficult to remove through coughing. Shaking and vibration manipulations performed over the chest can help to loosen these secretions so that they can be coughed up more easily. Deep...