Case Study

A 25-year-old female employee working several hours a day at a computer had been suffering for 2-3 years with bilateral neck stiffness and pain. She also had tension headache with occasional dizziness. Four months previously she had suffered for the first time with sciatic pain on her right side. Recently she had complained again of back pain, especially before getting up in the morning. Dr Ridi examined her and on opening the patient's mouth found that she had a lateral deviation of the mandible to the left and a left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) painful on palpation. The left temporal and external pterygoids were also tender on palpation. Dentition was complete with extensive reconstruction of the occlusal surfaces of the premolar and molar teeth. A point with low electrical skin resistance (ESR) within the left occiput area was identified with Agiscop (—) (Fig. 8.10). EMG recording with faithful application of the technique, according to the original instructions, showed an electrical activity which was higher than normal on both digastric and masseter muscles, on the right temporalis anterior and especially on both temporalis posterior muscles (Fig. 8.11A). Five minutes after NCT was performed on the left occiput point, a significant reduction of activity could be recorded on all

Fig. 8.10 Point with low ESR identified within the occiput area in a 25-year-old patient with neck pain and malocclusion.

muscles except the right digastric muscle (Fig. 8.11B). These variations remained unchanged throughout 30 minutes of EMG recording. Dr Ridi suggested making the patient a neuromuscular bite to wear regularly every night. This device steadily reduced her neck stiffness and no more back pain was observed in the follow-up (time of observation 8 years).

AVERAGE VALUES

RIGHT LEFT

TaMmMmTa TpDaDaTp R L R L

RIGHT

LEFT

RIGHT

LEFT

Fig. 8.11 EMG (Myotronics-EM2) average values in mV, before NCT (A); 5 minutes after NCT on the marked point of Figure 8.10 (B). Ta = temporalis anterior muscle; Mm = masseter muscle; Tp = temporalis posterior muscle; Da = digastric muscle

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