Asthenia And Familial Hypertension And Diabetes

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Asthenia (Greek asthenes, without strength) is a very common symptom and several patients from my group complained of symptoms such as tiredness or fatigue. As we know, asthenia may have different causes but is commonly associated with chronic pain, depression, sleep disorders, fibromy-algia and of course with infectious diseases or chronic disorders of the heart, lung or kidney.

If we simply compare ESRT and PPT in a group with this symptom we can see that the first diagnostic method shows several groups with significant concentrations of points. The richest cluster of points in proportion to the total (25%) corresponds to the pituitary-adrenal gland area. Next is the cervical muscle area on the medial side and in third place we have a broad area covering both the Chinese kidney and bladder area (on the left of Fig. 7.8). TCM could also be cited for this area because asthenia with depression and chronic pain, often reported by my middle-aged patients, particularly females, could imply a deficiency of Yin/ Yang Kidney. Regarding PPT, there is a major sen-sitization of one of the depressive mood areas which nevertheless does not reach a significant difference compared to ESRT (on the right of Fig. 7.8).

Ear Acupuncture Hypertension

Fig. 7.8 Cluster of points with low ESR in 30 subjects suffering from asthenia on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

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Fig. 7.8 Cluster of points with low ESR in 30 subjects suffering from asthenia on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

Fig. 7.9 Clusters of points with low ESR in 26 patients with familial hypertension but who themselves have normal blood pressure values on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

Fig. 7.9 Clusters of points with low ESR in 26 patients with familial hypertension but who themselves have normal blood pressure values on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

It is interesting, in my opinion, to see how these patterns of distribution of sectors can also be observed in other patients who, for example, have familial hypertension and diabetes but who are not affected by these disorders themselves (Figs 7.9, 7.10).

It is noteworthy that co-morbidity of these diseases is particularly manifest in the metabolic syndrome which seems to affect an increasing number of people. According to the American Heart Association,6 for this syndrome to be diagnosed at least three of the following should be present:

Elevated waist circumference: men - equal to or greater than 40 inches (102 cm); women - equal to or greater than 35 inches (88 cm). l Elevated triglycerides: equal to or greater than 150 mg/dL.

Reduced HDL ('good') cholesterol: men - less than 40 mg/dL; women - less than 50 mg/dL.

• Elevated blood pressure: equal to or greater than 130/85 mmHg or use of medication for hypertension. l Elevated fasting glucose: equal to or greater than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) or use of medication for hyperglycemia.

For the comparison shown in Figure 7.9 I considered a group of subjects without hypertension but who had at least one close relative with high blood pressure. An exclusion criterion in this group was that no subject should be diabetic or have familial diabetes.

For the comparison shown in Figure 7.10 I considered a group of subjects without diabetes but who had at least one member in their family who was being treated for hyperglycemia. In this group an exclusion criterion was that no subject should be treated for high blood pressure or have familial hypertension.

Fig. 7.10 Cluster of points with low ESR in 22 patients with family history of diabetes but who themselves have normal glucose levels on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

Fig. 7.10 Cluster of points with low ESR in 22 patients with family history of diabetes but who themselves have normal glucose levels on the left; cluster of tender points with PPT of the same subjects on the right. The colored sectors correspond to a significantly higher concentration of points, respectively, for ESRT vs. PPT on the left side or for PPT vs. ESRT on the right side of the figure. Colored areas = lateral surface; blank areas = medial surface.

Both groups showed a similar trend as regards the significantly higher concentration of points with reduced ESR in several sectors compared to PPT (on the left of Figs 7.9 and 7.10); on the other side not a single sector reached significance when comparing PPT with ESRT (on the right of Figs 7.9 and 7.10). The highest concentration of points with low ESR was on the pituitary-adrenal gland area; in second place were sectors 9-12 which contain clusters of points possibly corresponding to various structures: the cluster on the medial side corresponds to the cervical muscles, the cluster on the lateral side seems to be related to other structures such as the shoulder or the thyroid gland. In third place were sectors 23-25 related to the colon area, but in the group with familial hypertension we also find a cluster on the upper part of the triangular fossa overlapping with TF1 jiaowoshang area which has the main indication for hypertension (on the left of Fig. 7.9).

In the group with familial diabetes we can see at least three aligned clusters on sectors 16-19 which, summed up, do not show any significant difference between ESRT and PPT. If we exclude the cluster related to the back muscles we can note a higher concentration of points on the other two clusters which may be related to the pancreas-gallbladder area in the concha and to the area of allergy represented on the elbow-wrist zone. This coupled activation, in my opinion, could be the representation of a subliminal glucose intolerance. This condition may be considered a transitional state from normo-glycemia to frank diabetes and current knowledge suggests that development of this disease may be initiated by insulin resistance and worsened by the compensatory hyperinsulinemia.

An interesting phenomenon has been the observation, over time, in patients without metabolic syndrome of the loss of tenderness of these areas only when replacing white sugar with other sweeteners.

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