Community Partnerships

In 1989, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation invited communities to submit proposals to establish Community Partnerships, bringing together all segments of the community—parents, young people, schools, ethnic and cultural groups, religious institutions, businesses, local governing bodies, and social and civic organizations—to reduce substance abuse. So many communities responded to the foundation s invitation that the government arranged for $100 million in assets seized from drug smugglers to make even more funds available to communities to establish partnerships to prevent substance abuse and related problems.

As the community coalition movement grew, the Foundation funded Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) to lead it and join together, to provide technical assistance to coalitions and others. The Foundation also funded the Center on addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University to conduct research on substance-abuse issues.

Most authorities credit the activities of this sustained grass-roots, drug-prevention effort, as well as strategies implemented by federal, state, and local governments, with contributing to the reduction in drug abuse, drug addiction, and drug- and alcohol-related deaths that have occurred since the late 1970s. While drug use has increased since 1992, these increases in most cases are still below the levels of 1979. Reductions since then include the following:

• The number of Americans who are current users of illicit drugs was cut in half, from 24.0 million in 1979 to 11.0 million in 1992. The 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse shows that current drug use rose to 14.8

TABLE 1

Drug

Age Group

1979

1992

1999

Any Illicit Drug

Young Adults

38.0%

13.1%

18.8%

Seniors

38.9%

14.4%

25.9%

Youth

16.3%

5.3%

9.0%

Marijuana

Young Adults

35.6%

10.9%

16.4%

Seniors

36.5%

11.9%

23.1%

Youth

14.2%

3.4%

7.0%

Cocaine

Young Adults

9.9%

2.0%

1.9%

Seniors

5.7%

1.3%

2.6%

Youth

1.5%

0.3%

0.7%

Alcohol

Young Adults

75.1%

58.6%

60.2%

Seniors

71.8%

51.3%

51.0%

Youth

49.6%

20.9%

19.0%

Cigarettes

Young Adults

42.6%*

41.5%

41.0%

Seniors

34.4%

27.8%

34.6%

Youth

12.1%*

18.4%

15.9%

The significant reductions in drug abuse, drug addiction, and in drug-related deaths that have occurred over two decades suggest that prevention efforts should be continued and expanded and that private sector prevention efforts should be funded to increase positive gains.

*These figures are taken from the Overview of the 1991 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Final data were eliminated from later versions of the survey, and no information about cigarette use is available for youth or young adults for 1979.

The significant reductions in drug abuse, drug addiction, and in drug-related deaths that have occurred over two decades suggest that prevention efforts should be continued and expanded and that private sector prevention efforts should be funded to increase positive gains.

*These figures are taken from the Overview of the 1991 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Final data were eliminated from later versions of the survey, and no information about cigarette use is available for youth or young adults for 1979.

million by the end of the decade. Current cocaine use, which peaked in 1985, dropped from 5.8 to 1.3 million in 1992, and rose to 1.5 million in 1999. Daily marijuana use by high school seniors dropped 500 percent: from 10.7 percent in 1979 to 1.9 percent in 1992, and rose to 6.0 in 1998. Alcohol-related traffic deaths have been reduced from 26,000 to 15,935 per year.

• Table 1 shows drug use among young adults (18-25), high school seniors, and adolescents (12-17) in the peak year (1979), the lowest year (1992), and in 1999.

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Alcoholism is something that can't be formed in easy terms. Alcoholism as a whole refers to the circumstance whereby there's an obsession in man to keep ingesting beverages with alcohol content which is injurious to health. The circumstance of alcoholism doesn't let the person addicted have any command over ingestion despite being cognizant of the damaging consequences ensuing from it.

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